My Top Three Ways To Beat Blogging Procrastination

You know how it is.  You sit down with every intention of writing a blog post, when it suddenly strikes you that what you really need, is a cup of tea.  Or a piece of chocolate.  Or five pieces of chocolate.  Or you metaphorically hit yourself over the head as it occurs to you that you haven’t put any dishes or clothes on to wash recently: best not have that hanging over your head!  And perhaps you should walk the dog in case it needs walking while you’re mid-flow.  And when was the last time you checked your emails or Facebook? Who knows what might have happened in the world that you need to know about?! We’ve all practiced procrastination at some point or other, and while analysing and addressing the underlying reasons will help us in the long term, when you need to write that blog post, all that does is give you another way to procrastinate! So here are three ways I’ve used to beat blogging procrastination. One: Start by writing something unrelated.  It can be a commentary of your day so far, drawing a page full of doodles, or using a story prompt tool, such as oneword.com.  I love ‘The Art Of Getting Started’ by Lee Crutchley: it’s full of short exercises you can do to just get started. Two: Play something in the background to help you focus.  In the past I’ve listened to classical music, but these days I’m more likely to tune into coffitivity.com or brain.fm.  Both are great at helping me focus. Three: Blog with a buddy.  We do this every couple...

Giving Value Gets You Clients

I’m always looking to find new ways of adding value to my client relationships. So when my friend Laura from Commission Crowd sent me a link to a Business Zone article, written by Gavin Bell of Blue Cliff Media, about his value based selling approach, I was curious. Gavin has devised a simple, yet genius method to demonstrate his experience and expertise to potential clients, in a way that gives them something of value even if they don’t engage his services. He starts by compiling a list of potential clients from LinkedIn, before recording a video review of their social media activity. He emails them to ask if they’d like the review, and if they do he sends it to them. It gives them some useful pointers about what they can do to improve the results they get from using Social Media, whether they use Blue Cliff Media to help them or not. It’s such an abundant approach, and there are so many upsides that I can see. The businesses get better results from their social media, and Blue Cliff Media raises awareness of its brand, while establishing a raft of brand ambassadors. Because even if a business isn’t looking to engage the services of a digital marketing agency, they’ll be more likely to recommend Blue Cliff Media to other businesses who are. After all, they’ve had experience of their services, and their value-based approach. Adapting this idea to your industry or market may take a little imagination, but essentially it involves making a list of the people you can help and giving them something of value that’s pertinent to their business. If you’re a...

How To Write A Blog Post

A question I’m often asked is whether there’s an easy way to write a blog post.  Of course, the easiest and quickest posts to write, are the ones where you share a news article and write a few sentences of commentary about it.  But when it comes to writing a ‘proper’ post, this is my seven step process: I hope it gives you something to follow that makes it simpler and easier for you too. Step One: I start the process off using paper and pen.  For me there’s something in the process of physically writing down my thoughts on paper that helps my brain work out what I’m trying to say.  It makes the whole thing a lot easier.  It also means that if I change something, I can see how it’s developed, and access my earlier thoughts more easily than I could if I was deleting my words on screen. Step Two:  start with your blog post idea in the middle of a bit of paper and surround the idea with the main points you want to make, in the style of a mind map.  When I wrote a blog post about the five things you need if you want to get blogging and keep blogging, I started it off with a title in the middle of a bit of paper, and then drew seven lines out from the idea: one for each of the five things, and one each for the introduction and conclusion. Step Three: write what you want to say about each of those key points.  Write what you would say to someone if they were...

One Blog Post Does Not A Blog Make

In business we’re often looking out for the quick wins, the low-hanging fruit.  Sure, we’re wise to ‘get-rich-quick’ schemes, but if someone whispers that they have a shortcut, a sure-fire formula to grow our email list, get more customers, earn six-figure incomes; our ears prick up, and before you know it some persuasive copy and compelling testimonials mean we’re helping someone else make their own six-figure income. Of course experience tells us that once we’ve learned the shortcut, even the quickest of wins needs an investment of time and effort, and even low-hanging fruit can require a step-ladder to pick it.  When it comes to business, it’s rare that one size fits all, especially for service-based or high-end-product businesses.   So what works for someone else’s business will need adapting to work in yours; and even with their formula you’ll need to put the work in. The same is true of blogging.  Blogging is a valuable business tool: but as you would expect from a valuable business tool, it requires a strategic approach, commitment, time, and effort if it’s to work.  Which doesn’t mean it has to be dull and tedious.  It’s quite the opposite.  But you can’t publish one post and expect that to be that. The key is to start blogging and keep blogging. To post consistently and often.  And before long you’ll have built a bank of useful resources for your prospective customers: material that you can share again and again on digital media platforms, and that’ll help you establish rapport and build trust. Until next time, Happy...