The Danger of Overthinking

I’m a massive culprit of over-thinking.  I can literally think an idea to death in a matter of hours.  I’m talking about the best-idea-ever at breakfast becoming the worst idea in the entire world, what was I thinking, by lunch time.  It might seem like a productive way to get rid of bad ideas, but it gets rid of a lot of good ones too, and means I waste an inordinate amount of time thinking. It’s not just ideas.  My husband despairs of clothes shopping with me because I’ll try a few things on, decide I like them, and have talked myself out of making the purchase by the time we get to the tills.  Just by thinking about what else might be in the other shops, do I really need the item, what do I have that’ll go with it, is it the right shade of navy, do I have time to bring it back, is it too expensive, is it too cheap???  So by the time I come to pay, it’s all too difficult and I end up going home with nothing.  And you can bet that next week I’m opening my wardrobe and thinking that that top would’ve been lovely with these jeans for this occasion… I realised a few weeks ago that I was doing it again.  I’ve got a simple, straightforward idea for a business venture that I’m really excited about.  It’d been in the pipeline for a month or so, but because I’d had brain fog, I hadn’t had the brain capacity to think about it too much.  Then when the fog lifted, my brain...

A Story For A Story

I’ve always loved a good story.  When I was young, my favourite television programme was Jackanory, and I inhaled books from the moment I could read.  The stories in those books fed my imagination, inspired the best daydreams, expanded my vocabulary, helped me learn to express myself, and gave me confidence.  My favourite part of any family holiday was the pre-holiday trip to Waterstones, where we could choose whatever books we wanted.  The only rule was that we had to choose enough books to keep us entertained while we were away.  Heaven! But so what, I hear you cry.  You already know that I’m all about the stories.  Well, here’s the thing.  Recently I’ve been wondering about purpose.  Because my sense of purpose has been feeling a bit low.  This business feels a little narrow and I’d like to find more ways to help more people to be as awesome online as they are in real life.  So I have plans for that, and they’ll be coming soon.  But there’s something else I’d like to do.  I’ve been reading a book about a company called TOMS.  They started off making shoes, and for every pair of shoes they sold, they donated a pair of shoes to a child in need of some.  They’ve since expanded their range of products, but the principle remains the same: for every unit sold, someone benefits: one for one. And that’s what I’d like to do with stories.  For every story I help someone tell, I want to give the gift of a story to a child who doesn’t have access to the stories I had access to.  Not...

The Genius of Car Indicators

Whoever invented car indicators is a communications genius.  Think about it.  You’re locked in an enclosed metal box, with no way to tell the other boxed up individuals what you’re doing or where you’re going.  Without those little orange lights, there’d be chaos.  Complete and utter chaos.  Your choice would be to drive straight ahead at all times, or risk serious injury as all the other metal boxes collided with yours. Of course not all cars have indicators.  For some cars they appear to be optional extras, and their idiot owners forgot to tick the box during the order process.  Like the malaka (swearing in Greek isn’t really swearing) that almost caused my demise this morning because he was in the wrong lane (not a crime), wanted to be in my lane (not a drama), and proceeded to swerve into it without so much as a glance in his mirror, or a flick of the stick on his steering wheel (a blatant disregard for the highway code, and for that time of the morning, definitely a drama). Indicators help us to be clear about our intentions.  Using them means there’s no ambiguity about what we want to do.  If only we had such clarity when we leave our metal boxes!  I was eavesdropping on a conversation earlier, between two male students, who were having clarity problems with their girlfriends.  In one case, ex-girlfriend.  All because there was some ambiguity about whether their relationships were exclusive or not.  One seems to have made the mistake of asking if they were exclusive, which appears to have resulted in a break-up; the...