Kimber Holds The Key To Enduring Change

The other day I took Kimber for a walk up Drummond Hill.  Drummond Hill is a steep hill, populated by forests, walking paths, and stunning views.  We took a route we’d not taken before and I was perturbed to find that while we seemed to have made good upward progress, the path was now taking us quite far down.  I knew where this route begins it’s descent to the car park and we were nowhere near it, which meant we’d be climbing steeply upwards somewhere further along the route.  Before we got to that point, however, there was an opportunity to come off the hill altogether and progress homeward on a level, riverside path.  A year ago, I’d’ve done that; no question!  Actually, a year ago I probably wouldn’t have been on the hill in the first place.  I was so unfit, there’s no way I’d have been climbing a hill. So what’s changed?  In a word: Kimber.  Getting Kimber as a puppy has been the best thing ever for my fitness.  Because when you get a puppy, you don’t have to become superfit straightaway.  For me it started off by having to get up off my backside more often.  Did you know that just by standing up you start to have a positive impact on your fitness.  Talk about teeny-tiny baby steps!  So when I had to get up to put Kimber into the garden, or clear up her mess, or rescue her from a pickle, I was starting on the road to fitness.  Then, as she got a bit bolder, I’d have to chase after her to stop...

What Does Marketing Mean To You?

I’m not sure how comfortable I feel about the way some people seem to view marketing.  Don’t get me wrong, I want people to buy what I sell, I just don’t like the idea of shoving it in their faces, or pretending I’m giving some great information for free, when I’m actually telling them nothing and then pitching them a $500 course.  Or telling them they only have five minutes left to get the last one, or that if they don’t buy right now, the price will double for no discernible reason.  Marketing has started to feel like something you do to people.  Synonymous with employing as many methods as possible to get a sale.  Whether that sale will actually help the person who’s bought it or not. I remember working in the Bank when they first decided that frontline staff would be tasked with selling.  Most people argued that they weren’t a salesperson, and at the time I didn’t get it.  But those old-hands knew what was key:  understanding what people needed and making sure they got exactly that.  Not looking at the products they had and figuring out how to make them buy more. Since that time, advances in technology have made it easier than ever to reach your target market.  The great news is that it’s also made it easier to understand them, give them what they need more cheaply, and in ways that are accessible to many rather than a few.  To build loyal and long-lasting relationships.  To give webinars, use Facebook Groups, deliver e-courses across the world.  Websites help you show the world who you help and why they need you.  We...

Ghost Blogging: A Client Success Story!

I wonder how many people have become reacquainted thanks to Facebook?  That’s what happened to Suzie and I: we’d known each other as teenagers, and then lost touch as we went our separate ways.  By the time we reconnected we were both entrepreneurs, albeit in different fields.  Suzie owns a Human Resources Consultancy called Breathing Space HR, and I, of course, have The Write Angles.  By the time we met up for the first time in years, Suzie was already sending out a monthly email on an HR topic of interest.  She felt that the newsletter could use some variety, and worried that the subject matter was a bit too dry at times to keep people’s interest.  Plus, while each topic was useful, it wouldn’t always be relevant to everyone at the same time.  She wanted some blog post type articles for her newsletter on softer topics, such as leadership and motivation. She approached me with a very clear idea of what she was looking for.   She wanted posts that were useful, with a practical element that told her readers how they could implement her suggestions.  She wanted them to get a flavour of her, to be able to hear her voice and pick up her personality.  The technical HR articles didn’t often lend themselves to showing her human side, and since she was of the opinion that people buy people, she wanted these posts to help her show that. It was important to her that I conveyed her thoughts and feelings on the topics in hand, so we had an in-depth discussion about leadership styles, ways to motivate your...